EMDR offers an opportunity to address our brain's tendency to make our lives uncomfortable by bringing unwanted baggage from the past into the present. Our brain's number one job is to process and store information about our safety. Some of this information, like remembering to breathe, happens whether we think about it or not. In fact, most of the activity in our nervous system happens without our conscious awareness. When stress happens, our brains focus on survival, which can mean shutting down less "important" systems like conscious awareness. Our brains can file a warning: "if I see a man bigger than me, I should be scared" when we're young that continues to affect us as we get older. We may not even be aware of the fear response, we may just have trouble concentrating or speaking well in a meeting with an authority figure. The stress doesn't have to be war or abuse. It can be something boring like traffic. As we grow up, we develop beliefs to support our brain. We think we're not capable at work because we shut down in meetings. Then we find evidence to support this and start to think maybe we're not very good at anything. EMDR offers the brain a chance to reprocess some of these experiences on multiple levels so that we can get rid of the beliefs that limit our lives.

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Therapy (EMDR)

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Therapy (EMDR)

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